On this day in history, August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified, giving women the right to vote.


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The 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, which gave women the right to vote, was ratified on this day in history on August 18, 1920.

It is considered a major landmark in the struggle for gender equality.

This amendment was made by Susan B. It was called the Anthony Amendment, in reference to the renowned suffragette whose extraordinary efforts defended women’s right to be heard at the ballot box.

On this day in history, Wyoming Territory was formed, proving to be a global leader in women’s suffrage

“From the earliest history of our country, woman has shown equal devotion to man in the cause of liberty, and has stood firmly by his side in its defense,” Anthony wrote in the July 4th Declaration of the Rights of Women of the United States. , 1876.

“Woman’s wealth, thought, and labor have cemented the stones of every monument that man has raised to freedom.”

Alice Paul unfurls a banner from the balcony of the National Women’s Party headquarters, showing a star for each state that ratified the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Women celebrated Tennessee’s ratification of the amendment in August 1920 – making the amendment law.
(Bettman/Getty Images)

Women first got the right to vote in the US in 1869 in Wyoming Territory.

After another half century of struggle, the nationwide effort to enfranchise all American women gained momentum with the November 1918 midterm elections.

Republicans swept both houses of Congress in November.

A new Senate approved the amendment in June 1919 and sent it to the states “after 41 years of debate,” according to the chamber’s official history.

“Woman has shown equal devotion to man for the cause of liberty, and has stood firmly by him in its defense.”

The Senate defeated the amendment several times over the previous four decades, most recently in October 1918. It later received the approval of three-quarters of the 48 states.

And in the summer of 1920, the opportunity to become the all-important 36th state fell upon the Tennessee Assembly.

A young Tennessee legislator and suffragist, Harry T. Burn, 24, reconsidered his position on the issue after receiving a warning from his determined mother.

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“The state Senate voted to ratify it, but the House failed to do so twice by two votes of 48 to 48,” History.com notes.

“Just as the third vote was set to begin, Burn A A letter from his motherPhoebe Ensminger wrote, in part, ‘Hurray and vote for the voters and don’t keep them in doubt… I’ve been watching to see how you stand but haven’t seen anything yet… Don’t forget to be a good boy.”

Susan B.  Anthony (1820-1906), a prominent suffragist, advocated the right of women to be heard at the ballot box.

Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), a prominent suffragist, advocated the right of women to be heard at the ballot box.

Bern listened to his mother on the third vote. His “yes” broke the barrier and decided confirmation.

The passage of the 19th Amendment came just two months later, giving millions of women the right to vote in presidential elections.

Warren G. Harding, an Ohio Republican, defeated Democrat and fellow Buckeye James Cox and his running mate Franklin D. Roosevelt easily defeated him, winning 37 of 48 states and 60 percent of the popular vote.

On this day in history, July 28, the 14th Amendment was ratified, guaranteeing equality to all Americans.

The 19th Amendment was ratified amid a flurry of constitutional activism in the wake of World War I, following the Civil War, the Reconstruction Amendments (13th, 14th, 15th) were ratified immediately after the conflict.

Endorsed by the National Woman's Suffrage Association, published in 1910 by the Cargill Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, a suffrage postcard with a four-star American flag celebrating Wyoming as the first of four states to grant women full voting rights.  Photography by Emilia Van Beugen.

Endorsed by the National Woman’s Suffrage Association, published in 1910 by the Cargill Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, a suffrage postcard with a four-star American flag celebrating Wyoming as the first of four states to grant women full voting rights. Photography by Emilia Van Beugen.
(Ken Florey Suffrage Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

But not everyone was successful.

The 18th Amendment, ratified just one year before the 19th, banned the sale of alcohol in the United States.

The 20th Amendment repealed it in 1933.

The 19th Amendment was part of a global effort among Western nations to give women the right to vote amid the turmoil of World War I.

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Norway was the first country to allow women to vote in 1913.

Doors begin to open at the end World War I Great Britain (1918), Germany (1918) and the Netherlands (1919) granted universal voting rights to all women.

France did not allow women to vote until 1944.

The 19th Amendment is short, its brevity reinforcing its necessity.

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It states that “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex.”

“Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”



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